3 Educational Toys Toddlers Love

3 Educational Toys Toddlers Love

If you are a parent, you know how hard your toddlers are to please and how important it is that they are simultaneously learning while they are playing. However, with so many educational toys for toddlers on the market right now, which ones do you pick? If you Google ‘educational toys for toddlers’, there will be millions on millions of results and it can be overwhelming. Here are some ideas to help a parent out. I am sure your toddlers will love them!

POKE – A – DOT BOOK

In this book, there are little raised buttons on each page that toddlers can click and poke, all while learning the alphabet! It is an interactive book that challenges their memory and mind. Toddlers can learn alphabet and animals faster from of this book. This brand also has many more books to teach your toddlers about the ocean, counting and even colors!

MOUSE IN A BOX

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This toy allows toddlers to take responsibility for the little mouse. They can feed the mouse every morning and night, they can play with it during the day, and they can even tuck it into bed. They can use their imagination and while learning about responsibility.

COLORING 

   Image result for kid drawing

You cannot go wrong with plain paper or a coloring book and some crayons! Young children benefit from drawing on plain paper as they can explore using their own lines, designs, colors, and creativity while increasing dexterity, motor skills and pencil grip. Coloring books can be introduced at a later age, when children are ready for them. While we promote open-ended coloring, coloring books may have their place in helping with focus, hand-eye coordination, and patience. They may also spark ideas for how to draw their favorite characters, scenes or objects. However, keep in mind that some children may find coloring books frustrating since they have yet to develop the dexterity for staying in the lines. If your child is frustrated with coloring pages, do not stress him/her out…stick with plain paper and save the books for a few years down the line.

The crayons shown above are a great tool to teach toddlers their colors, allowing them to draw and scribble. Coloring is a great way for them to use their imagination while developing their fine motor and cognitive skills. These crayons are shaped like a triangle to help them develop a proper writing grip. As a perk, they will not roll away or off the table!

Author: Nhi Quach, CSULA intern

Traveling With Kids

Traveling with Kids

We all know that traveling with kids can be a nightmare! Let’s face it…traveling is stressful, even without kids. Add restless, impatient, and messy little ones to the mix and it is a completely new ball game. Much of our fear is probably due to the potential angry glares which other travelers tend to throw at parents traveling with their children (maybe you have thrown those invisible daggers yourself before). Part of it is also because we just don’t know what will happen when we are trapped 10,000 feet above ground…and so we imagine the worst: from diaper blowouts to 6-hour screaming sessions.

As travel dates creep closer, we begin to dread and worry about how our kids will do on the journey. Besides dealing with car seats, strollers, diaper bags, and other necessary child contraptions, we are afraid of being that parent whose children are a terror to the rest of the people on the plane.

The good news is, with a little preparation, you can minimize many of the biggest concerns about flying with kids and you do not have to be the most hated parent on the plane. In fact, you may be the envy of them! AND, you might actually enjoy it in the process. So how can you make this trip less of a disaster? Well, listen up traveling families.

These tips will help make traveling less stressful:

  • Strategically Plan Your Flight- if your child still takes naps or tends to get tired at a certain time of the day, try scheduling your flight for that drowsy time (if possible)
  • Ease the Discomfort of Flying- Pack ear plugs to relieve air pressure discomfort. Lollipops, pacifiers, sippy cups and bottles are also great for minimizing plugged ears.
  • Pack for Success – Pack an additional diaper bag with milk bottles and juice boxes, spare outfits,  a special blankie, favorite stuffed animals, and several immersive kid distractions .
  • Pull Out All the Distractions to Make the Time Fly By- Mark your belongings with your contact info just in case they get lost.

    • Pack a few books about traveling to keep them engaged about their trip. A few titles to enjoy are: My Plane Trip, by Cathy Beylon, My First Trip on an Airplane, by Katie Kawa, and My First Plane Ride, by Elizabeth Benjamin, Erin Gathrid

    • Children should be able to pack and carry his/her own entertainment in a small backpack which can include: sticker books, toys that don’t have too many pieces, an iPad (with new offline games), and a portable DVD player (with 2+ hours of videos). Don’t forget the headphones and remember to make sure everything is charged!

    • Children can also carry along a new pack of triangular crayons and a pad of paper.

  • Pack Helpful Accessories to Save Your Sanity- In addition to toys, don’t forget these essentials

    • Extra clothes for you and your child

    • Lots of wet wipes and large zip lock bags (use as garbage bags and other uses)

    • Snacks (crackers, string cheese, carrots, dried fruit)

    • Medication and first aid supplies (hand sanitizer, children’s Tylenol, antidiarrheal option, kids’ vitamins, and band aids)

  • Teach Your Kids What to Expect and How to Behave- Attend to your children

    • Watch out for signs of over-stimulation or boredom, have fun with them on the flight, and spend quality time with your children.

Author: Jenny Thieu, CSULA intern

Family Fun!

Family Fun Ideas

Family bonding is essential for the developmental growth of children. It does not only encourage stronger relationships, but it helps develop language. Research has indicated that positive parent-child interactions benefits children’s social, cognitive and language development. According to Mary Ainsworth, children who are engaged in a secure parent-child relationship are more likely to be independent, emotionally stable, and have trust. Some activities that foster family bonding include going on vacation, museum weekends, and going to the zoo. Family bonding can also include simple family activities that can be done at home. Playing ball, baking, making crafts, and playing board games are all easy ways to enjoy time together. The main goal/idea is to bond and interact with your children.

    

Some ideas that can increase family bonding time include making slime or going on a scavenger hunt.

Making Slime

   

 

Making slime is a fun and interactive way to talk to your children. You can ask open-ended questions that can develop their critical thinking skills. As questions such as: How does it feel? What do you think will happen next?

Making slime can be done with stuff at home…

Slime Recipe:

½ cup of glue (clear or regular)

1 teaspoon of Borax or liquid starch

2 measuring cups

water

2 medium bowls

Add food coloring or glitter if desired. Tip: Add food coloring directly to the water.

Procedure:

  1. First, start by pouring 1 cup of water and 1 teaspoon of Borax into a bowl. Mix together until dissolved.
  2. Next, mix ½ cup of glue and ½ cup of water into the other bowl.
  3. Add the water and borax mixture little by little into the bowl with the glue.
  4. The mixture should start thickening.
  5. Knead it together until you get a slimy texture. It should ooze freely without sticking to your hands too much.

 

Scavenger Hunt Game at the Zoo

   

List your favorite animals onto a list before going to the zoo. This offers a great opportunity to ask children about their favorite animals. Such questions may arise such as what sound does that animal make? What do they eat?

Whatever activity you choose, enjoy and cherish this time with your children. Stay relaxed, smile lots, and truly get to know them.

By: Marbel Torres, CSULA Intern

Mom’s Club Preschool Fair – January 21

Do you know anyone looking for a preschool? Spread the word…we have your one stop preschool shop! The annual Mom’s Club Preschool Fair will be held on the PCS campus on January 21st from 10:00 am – 1:00pm. There will be more than 40 local-area preschools and preschool-oriented vendors on site. Bring the kids as there will be face painting, a train ride, and more!

Bring your friends! We hope to see you there!

Now Accepting Applications for 2017-2018

Dear Parents,

Applications for NEW students for the 2017-2018 school year are now available online. If you have a non-enrolled sibling who you would like to enroll for NEXT school year, please complete the online application as soon as possible. If you already applied for this year, but did not get in or chose to defer, your application will be automatically rolled over for guaranteed acceptance in the summer and fall.
Please note that siblings have priority placement through the end of December. We will begin offering placement to outside families in January, at which time all applications will be taken and placed based on availability in the order they are received.
Students need to be at least two years old on or before August 21st. On occasion, we can hold spaces for students turning two after the start of school, so please talk with Kristin about the possibility of a late-enrollment.
If your child is currently enrolled, you do not have to apply again. You will receive an “intent to enroll” form in December to hold your child’s space for the following year.
P.S. If you have friends who would be interested in our school, please send them our way. Applications are open and tours are filling up. Spaces will be very limited for new students, so encourage them to apply early.

Save the Date: Vision Screenings

Pasadena Christian Preschool will be offering free vision screenings for our Older Pod students (Room 1, 2 & 3) on Tuesday, September 27th and Wednesday, September 28th 2016.
Why are vision screenings important?  Early detection and intervention of vision issues help children to be successful in their overall development and well-being.
Vision screenings are important and can benefit children by detecting any eye conditions early on. Often, due to lack of prior screenings, vision problems aren’t diagnosed  until the elementary school years.
Please use this information to help aid your child’s vision health and have your child participate in the Elks vision screening offered at school. Or, schedule a vision screening with your pediatric optometrist.
Here’s a quick list of some ways to identify if your child is having vision problems:
  • Squinting
  • Eyes turning inward or outward
  • Headaches
  • Holding reading material or pictures closer than normal
  • Rubbing eyes
  • Turning or tilting head to use one eye only
We are looking forward to your child’s participation in these screenings. Permission forms are required. Please be on the lookout for permission forms in your email and in the front office.
Author: Maria Esquivel  CSULA Child Development Intern.